Year
2021
Units
4.5
Contact
2 x 1-hour lectures weekly
1 x 1-hour tutorial weekly
Enrolment not permitted
PHIL1030A has been successfully completed
Assessment
Assignments; Tutorial presentation; Tutorial participation.
Topic description

An introduction to moral and social philosophy through a study of modern conceptions of freedom, power and morality. It considers questions such as: Is what we do really right or wrong? What are the fundamental principles of morality? Do we need government, and, if so, how should we be governed? Is our society a free society?

Educational aims

This topic aims to:

  • Address in an introductory way the key issues in metaethics, normative ethics and political philosophy in modern philosophy
  • Encourage students to comprehend and identify key points in contemporary discussion of metaethics, normative ethics and political philosophy
  • Encourage students to formulate approaches to issues and develop, making reference to significant contributions in modern philosophy, a relatively simple argument for an important position in some key debates in all three of the areas of contemporary metaethics, normative ethics and political philosophy
  • Equip students to:
    • Comprehend in a basic way significant positions and arguments in all three of the areas of contemporary metaethics, normative ethics and political philosophy
    • Engage in relatively simple but sound argument for or against some of those positions
    • Evaluate the soundness of significant arguments found in modern philosophy for and against those positions
Expected learning outcomes
On completion of this topic you will be expected to be able to:

  1. Demonstrate that you have read and understood introductory discussions of some important issues in contemporary metaethics, normative ethics and political philosophy
  2. Demonstrate that you have read and understoodsome key arguments on important issues in contemporary metaethics, normative ethics and political philosophy
  3. Articulate in discussion and in written work understanding of some important issues in contemporary metaethics, normative ethics and political philosophy that interest them
  4. Articulate in discussion and in written work a philosophical debate on these issues
Articulate in discussion and in written work rationally-drawn conclusions from the debate thus presented

Key dates and timetable

(1), (2)

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Classes are held weekly unless otherwise indicated.

FULL

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  Unless otherwise advised, classes are not held during semester breaks or on public holidays.