Year
2021
Units
4.5
Contact
1 x 1-hour lecture weekly
1 x 1-hour tutorial weekly
3 x 3-hour film screenings per semester
Enrolment not permitted
HIST3044 has been successfully completed
Topic description

This topic will aim to provide a critical understanding of the nature and development of terrorism through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and its interrelatedness to society. The topic will cover the debates around the origins and explanations of terrorism, the various types of terror, such as state and non-state terror, the factors contributing to the logic/justifications of terror and the methods of terror. Cases will be drawn from Europe and its periphery, including, IMRO, EOKA, IRA, ETA and others, but the wider global context will not be lost sight of. The fundamental questions this topic seeks to address are: what are the differences between why governments use terrorism and why individual groups use terrorism? How have targets of terrorist attacks and methods of violence changed? How have perceptions of terrorism changed?

Educational aims

This topic aims to:

  • Understand the interrelatedness of terrorism and society
  • Recognise various forms of terror in Europe
  • Identify the various origins of terrorism in Europe
  • Compare the characteristics of various examples of terrorism and state terror in Europe
  • Understand the aims and roles of perpetrators
  • Examine the question of what can be done to prevent the recourse to terrorism
  • Become familiar with various wars and their effects on society from the mid 18th century until today
Expected learning outcomes
On completion of this topic you will be expected to be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a critical and comparative insight into terrorism in Europe, the experiences of terrorism from the perspective of perpetrators and victims, the methods of terrorism and effectson societies
  2. Analyse a range of secondary reading, assessing the value of this material in terms of argument and research
  3. Analyse a wide range of primary sources and determine their contexts
  4. Develop the ability to use their knowledge to plan, analyse, think critically, reflect upon and evaluate ideas, options and decisions
  5. Demonstrate and awareness of ethical issues related to the field of history generally and to the issues of this topic
  6. Apply effective oral and written communication skills so as to write/present properly structured, clearly argued, fluently expressed essays and oral presentations
  7. Exchange and debate ideas with other members of the class and with the tutor with the utmost integrity and respect
  8. Worked regularly, independently and collaboratively to meet the prescribed deadlines and activities

Key dates and timetable

(1), (2)

Each class is numbered in brackets.
Where more than one class is offered, students normally attend only one.

Classes are held weekly unless otherwise indicated.

FULL

If you are enrolled for this topic, but all classes for one of the activities (eg tutorials) are full,
contact your College Office for assistance. Full classes frequently occur near the start of semester.

Students may still enrol in topics with full classes as more places will be made available as needed.

If this padlock appears next to an activity name (eg Lecture), then class registration is closed for this activity.

Class registration normally closes at the end of week 2 of each semester.

Classes in a stream are grouped so that the same students attend all classes in that stream.
Registration in the stream will result in registration in all classes.
  Unless otherwise advised, classes are not held during semester breaks or on public holidays.