Year
2021
Units
4.5
Contact
1 x 2-hour seminar weekly
Prerequisites
1 Admission into BLAWLP-Bachelor of Laws and Legal Practice
1a Admission into BLAWLPG-Bachelor of Laws and Legal Practice (Graduate Entry)
1b Admission into BLAWLPR-Bachelor of Laws and Legal Practice
1c Admission into BLAWLPRG-Bachelor of Laws and Legal Practice (Graduate Entry)
1d Admission into BLAWLPRH-Bachelor of Laws and Legal Practice (Honours)
1e Admission into BLAWLPRGH-Bachelor of Laws and Legal Practice (Graduate Entry) (Honours)
1f Admission into DIPLCR-Diploma of Letters (Criminology)
1g Admission into BLITTCR-Bachelor of Letters (Criminology)
1h Admission into BLITTCRG-Bachelor of Letters (Criminology) (Graduate Entry)
2 9 Units of CRIM topics
3 4.5 Units of CRIM topics
4 4.5 Units of LEGL topics
Must Satisfy: (((1 or 1a or 1b or 1c or 1d or 1e or 1f or 1g or 1h)) or (2) or (3 and 4))
Enrolment not permitted
CRIM3002 has been successfully completed
Assessment
Assignment(s), Examination(s)
Topic description

This topic will examine the development of modern policing in Australia and overseas, evaluate the role of the police in modern society, and look at a variety of policing subjects of contemporary interest. Subjects to be covered may include: police powers and discretion; police accountability; police misconduct; police corruption; police and the media; private policing; police and minority groups; police-Aboriginal relations; community policing; police and young people; public order policing; drug law enforcement; and, policing organised and corporate crime. Normally the topic is supplemented by a field trip, as well as the participation of guest lecturers.

Educational aims

This topic aims to:

  • Introduce students to a range of key concepts and debates about policing and law enforcement
  • Place modern police forces into context in terms of changing approaches to social control in Western societies over the past three hundred years
  • Examine the different police functions and the nature of police organisations and police personnel
  • Explore transnational policing and future trends in law enforcement
Expected learning outcomes
On completion of this topic you will be expected to be able to:

  1. Explain a range of key concepts and debates about policing and law enforcement
  2. Contribute to key debates about policing and law enforcement
  3. Summarise the history of policing
  4. Distinguish the different police functions and the nature of police organisations and police personnel
  5. Evaluate the necessity of transnational policing in contemporary society
  6. Conduct research using tools relevant to the policing field

Key dates and timetable

(1), (2)

Each class is numbered in brackets.
Where more than one class is offered, students normally attend only one.

Classes are held weekly unless otherwise indicated.

FULL

If you are enrolled for this topic, but all classes for one of the activities (eg tutorials) are full,
contact your College Office for assistance. Full classes frequently occur near the start of semester.

Students may still enrol in topics with full classes as more places will be made available as needed.

If this padlock appears next to an activity name (eg Lecture), then class registration is closed for this activity.

Class registration normally closes at the end of week 2 of each semester.

Classes in a stream are grouped so that the same students attend all classes in that stream.
Registration in the stream will result in registration in all classes.
  Unless otherwise advised, classes are not held during semester breaks or on public holidays.