Year
2021
Units
4.5
Contact
3 x 50-minute lectures weekly
3 x 6-hour laboratories per semester
4 x 6-hour project works per semester
Enrolment not permitted
CHEM3702 has been successfully completed
Assumed knowledge
CHEM1102 Modern Chemistry and CHEM2702 Organic Reactions or equivalent.
Topic description

The aim is to provide students with an overview of the role and importance that transition metal ions play in inorganic chemistry and in organometallic chemistry and their relevance to nanotechnology. Secondly, students will learn to use the modern approach of molecular orbital theory to develop chemical bonding concepts across the periodic table, and so to acquire an understanding of ligand field theory. The spectral and magnetic properties of transition metal ions can then be understood at a sophisticated level, which allows these transition metals to be used diagnostically to identify and characterise compounds. Finally, this topic will present students with the fundamentals of inorganic chemical synthesis through a series of practical experiments. These practical experiments and the individual report will solidify students knowledge and skills in the field of inorganic chemistry and showcase the use and relevance of inorganic chemicals in nanotechnology.

Educational aims

This topic aims to:

  • Develop and use the modern approach of molecular orbital theory to develop chemical bonding concepts and provide an understanding of ligand field theory (The spectral and magnetic properties of transition metal ions can then be understood at a sophisticated level, which allows them to be used diagnostically to identify and characterise transition metal compounds)
  • Provide an overview of the role that metal ions play at the nanoscale in biological chemistry and of the inorganic chemistry associated with organometallic compounds
  • Continue the development of laboratory skills associated with synthetic work pertaining to inorganic and organometallic compounds
Expected learning outcomes
On completion of this topic you will be expected to be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding about what various types transition metal compounds are and how they can be used in nanotechnology
  2. Understand the molecular orbital description for bonding in an octahedral coordination complex
  3. Know about the synthesis, characterisation and reactivity of metal carbonyls and pie-complexes, including metal cyclopentadienyls and how they can be used to synthesize nano-sized objects
  4. Understand the chemical bonding in metal carbonyl and metal pie-complexes
  5. Be familiar with the major industrial catalytic processes that employ organometallic catalysts
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of what metal clusters are, how they form and react and how their bonding can be understood
  7. Be familiar with the method of uptake and retention of metal ions in biological systems
  8. Use the concept of metal ion hydrolysis to understand and make limited predictions of metal ion speciation in aqueous solution
  9. Handle and report on transition metal compounds, including those which are sensitive to air and/or moisture, competently in a laboratory with due regard to occupational health and safety
  10. Evaluate and present results from laboratory work in written and verbal form
  11. Show an understanding of the relevance of transition metals to nano-technology

Key dates and timetable

(1), (2)

Each class is numbered in brackets.
Where more than one class is offered, students normally attend only one.

Classes are held weekly unless otherwise indicated.

FULL

If you are enrolled for this topic, but all classes for one of the activities (eg tutorials) are full,
contact your College Office for assistance. Full classes frequently occur near the start of semester.

Students may still enrol in topics with full classes as more places will be made available as needed.

If this padlock appears next to an activity name (eg Lecture), then class registration is closed for this activity.

Class registration normally closes at the end of week 2 of each semester.

Classes in a stream are grouped so that the same students attend all classes in that stream.
Registration in the stream will result in registration in all classes.
  Unless otherwise advised, classes are not held during semester breaks or on public holidays.