Year
2020
Units
4.5
Contact
2 x 50-minute lectures weekly
5 x 50-minute tutorials per semester
Prerequisites
1 Admission into BPSG-Bachelor of Psychological Studies (Graduate Entry)
2 2 of PSYC1101, PSYC1102
Must Satisfy: ((1) or (2))
Enrolment not permitted
PSYC2016 has been successfully completed
Assumed knowledge
The topic assumes a basic knowledge of psychological principles at the First Year level.
Course context
Psychology major: Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), Bachelor of Psychological Studies (Graduate Entry), Bachelor of Behavioural Science (Psychology), Bachelor of Psychological Science, Bachelor of Arts
Topic description
This topic is designed to provide students with an overview of some fundamental learning principles, basic cognitive processes and their physiological bases. Theoretical issues of classical and operant conditioning, short-term and long-term memory, attention and imagery, spatial learning and human factors, and the underlying physiological processes, are complemented with clinical, developmental and ergonomic applications. Practical work elaborates key concepts addressed in the lecture program, and gives students the opportunity to acquire experience with experimental research.
Educational aims
The aim of this topic is to provide students with an understanding of some fundamental learning principles, basic cognitive processes and their physiological bases. Content will focus on short- and long-term memory, attention, imagery, learning and human factors, and their theoretical bases, complemented with clinical, developmental and ergonomic applications. The practical component will consolidate concepts addressed in the lecture program and will equip students with a working knowledge of basic methodological skills through participation in, and discussion of, experimental research.
Expected learning outcomes
Students successfully completing the topic should be able to demonstrate:
  • A working knowledge of basic learning principles, cognitive processes and their physiological bases
  • A firm knowledge of mental representations, mental models, mental images, human factors/ergonomics, human and animal spatial cognition
  • Insight into applications of learning theories and cognitive models
  • An understanding of the link between theoretical constructs and research techniques
  • Basic methodological skills, through participation in, and discussion of, the research process
  • Good written communication skills

    They should also be able to:
    • Use conventional and electronic techniques to review literature
    • Synthesise and express scientific ideas and analytical thought
    • Participate in group argument and discussion